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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Aircraft

Why do I have to pay taxes on my aircraft?

California Constitution Article XIII and Revenue and Taxation Code section 201 state that all property is taxable unless it is stated that it is exempt. Personal property is not exempt.

I paid the sales tax when I purchased the aircraft. Why am I paying taxes again?

Sales tax and property tax are two different types of taxes.

  • Sales tax is paid at the time of purchase.
  • Personal property taxes are paid annually.

Why did I receive an Aircraft Property Statement?

The filing of an annual Aircraft Property Statement is a requirement of section 441(d) of the California Revenue and Taxation Code. Statements are sent in order to gather the most up to date information on the property so that an accurate value can be determined.

What will happen if I do not return the Aircraft Property Statement?

It is important that the statement be returned every year. If you no longer own the aircraft, you are still required to notify the Assessor in writing. If a statement is not returned, an estimated assessment will be made using the best information available, and a 10% penalty on the assessed value will be added for failure to file a statement as mandated per California Revenue and Taxation Code, section 463.

Where will my aircraft be assessed since I take it to many locations?

The aircraft should be assessed where habitually situated. The location where an aircraft is habitually situated is the airport at which the aircraft is usually present when not in flight. If an aircraft spends a substantial amount of time at multiple airports, it is habitually situated at the airport where it spends the most ground time.

How is the aircraft value determined?

The value is determined by reviewing the annual Aircraft Property Statement, confirmed sales of similar aircraft, and value guides such as Aircraft Blue Book.

Why is the average retail value, as listed in the price guide for January 1, different from the assessed value?

California Revenue and Taxation Code, Property Tax Rule 10, mandates that the Assessor include within the value all components of the full economic cost of placing property in service. An aircraft value may typically include an adjustment to the average retail base to add sales or use taxes, freight or shipping cost, labor and materials, or after-market additions.

Why did my aircraft value go up/down from last year?

For the purpose of California property taxation, aircraft are valued at their fair market value each and every year as of the January 1 lien date. Values determined for previous years cannot be used as a factor in determining the current year’s value. Values can increase as well as decrease from year to year because of fluctuations in the market. Aircraft, unlike real property, are not subject to a base year value or a minimum inflationary factor. The fair market value of an aircraft on lien date is unrelated to its net book value (purchase price less depreciation).

What if I do not agree with the aircraft value?

You may call, email, or write to the Assessor’s Office to discuss the value. When making a written request for an informal review, please note that if the value was the result of an estimated assessment made by the Assessor for failure to file a property statement by May 7, you will need to complete and return an Aircraft Property Statement with your request for an informal review.

When writing to request an informal review, please provide the following in support of your opinion of value:

  • Comparable sales of aircraft that have sold close to January 1st. Sales occurring after March 31st may not be considered.
  • Photos and estimates to repair (if condition considerably affects the value).
  • The exact year, make, and model (if not previously provided).
  • Documentation showing the insured value as of January 1st.
  • An appraisal for the aircraft.
  • Any additional documentation that would support your opinion of value.

What if I still do not agree with the aircraft value after an Assessor’s Informal Review?

You can file an Application for Changed Assessment with the Assessment Appeals Board online or by calling (530) 889-4020. In order to appeal an assessment, you must file an Application for Changed Assessment with the Clerk of the Board, between July 2 and September 15 (or the next business day if September 15 falls on a weekend or holiday).

Should your value notice be the result of an escape assessment, you have 60 days from the date of the Notice of Enrollment of Escape Assessment to file an Application for Changed Assessment.

Why do I have a 10% penalty note on my tax bill for my aircraft?

Either the Assessor’s request to file a valid statement was not received by May 7th or no statement was received. California Revenue & Taxation Code section 463 mandates that a late filing penalty of 10% of the assessed value be added for statements not timely filed by May 7th. The Assessment Appeals Board is the only authority with the ability to abate a penalty for late filing.

What should I do when I sell my aircraft?

Contact the Federal Aviation Administration, and notify the Assessor’s Office in writing with information regarding the sale or file an Aircraft Affidavit.

I sold or disposed of my aircraft after January 1st. Why do I have a tax bill?

Please complete and return an Aircraft Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor’s Office. Under California Law, the owner of an aircraft at 12:01 a.m., January 1 (lien date) is responsible for taxes and must be assessed at full value. Sale or disposal of property after the lien date does not relieve the Assessee of the obligation to pay taxes.

I sold or disposed of my aircraft before January 1st. Why do I have a tax bill?

Please complete and return an Aircraft Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor’s Office. Based upon that affidavit, an informal review of your assessment will be completed.

Can my taxes be prorated?

No. Unsecured bills are never prorated regardless of disposal date. Any proration of taxes should be done between the buyer and seller at the time of sale.

I filed bankruptcy. Why do I have to pay the tax?

Bankruptcy does not relieve the Assessor of determining a fair market value. Assessed value and payment of taxes are separate issues. You should contact the Placer County Tax Collector at (530) 889-4120 for issues regarding whether payment is required after bankruptcy.

Business Property

Why do I have to pay taxes on my business personal property?

California Constitution Article XIII and Revenue and Taxation Code section 201 state that all property is taxable unless it is stated that it is exempt. Business personal property is not exempt.

I paid sales tax when I purchased this equipment. Why am I paying taxes again?

Sales tax and property tax are two different types of taxes.

  • Sales tax is paid at the time of purchase.
  • Personal property taxes are paid annually.

What is unsecured property?

Unsecured property is a personal liability of an Assessee, generally the owner of a business, which has not had the tax payment secured by the ownership of real property.

Why do I have to file a Business Property Statement?

An annual filing of a Business Property Statement is a requirement of section 441(d) of the California Revenue and Taxation Code. Statements are sent in order to gather the most up to date information on the business property so that an accurate value can be determined.

What is this BOE 571 Business Property Statement form used for?

This is a requirement of section 441(d) of the California Revenue and Taxation Code. An Assessor’s request for the filing of an annual statement is sent in order to gather the most up to date information on the business property so that an accurate value can be determined.

What will happen if I do not file this form?

It is important that the statement be returned even if you no longer own the business property. If a statement is not returned, an estimated assessment will be made using the best information available, and a 10% penalty on the assessed value will be added for failure to file as mandated by the California Revenue and Taxation Code section 463.

How do I fill out the form?

Refer to the instructions provided. If you still have questions, please contact the Assessor’s Office at (530) 889-4300 or visit our office at 2980 Richardson Drive, Auburn.

Can I file my form electronically?

For your convenience, the Assessor’s Office offers access to a free online filing program (E-File) from mid-January until May 7th at 5:00 p.m. annually. E-Filing is quick and secure, with an immediate confirmation that your filing has been accepted. The E-Filing program replaces the need for a printed submission of the Business Property Statement to be mailed to the Assessor’s Office.

I tried to E-File but I can’t find the link mentioned in my letter?

The E-Filing program is not available after May 7th at 5:01 p.m. All statements filed after May 7th at 5:00 p.m. must be submitted by mail.

I found the E-Filing link, but it is asking for a Business Identification Number (BIN)? What is this and how do I obtain one?

The Business Identification Number (BIN) is a unique access code that provides private and secure access to your property statement through the E-File program. A new BIN is issued each year and is included with the Notice and Assessor’s Request to File a Business Property Statement letter sent in January. Because the BIN is unique each year, the BIN you received last year will not work to grant you future access to the E-Filing program. If you require a new BIN, you will need to contact the Assessor’s Office at asr_business@placer.ca.gov.

Can I return my completed Business Property Statement by fax or as an email attachment?

Statements returned to the Assessor by fax or email must be accompanied by a cover letter on company letterhead. This cover letter must include a description of the information being submitted, contact name and telephone number, email address, and be signed and dated by the taxpayer or taxpayer’s authorized agent. All emailed statements must be in a PDF format and submitted to asr_business@placer.ca.gov.

I have a home-based business and all my equipment is my own personal equipment. Do I have to report it?

Yes. If you are using the equipment for business purposes, it is reportable, assessable, and taxable as business personal property.

My business property is moveable and goes in and out of the County depending on the job. Which county should I report it to?

Movable property has situs where it is located on the lien date of January 1 if it has been in the county for more than 6 of the 12 months before the lien date and is expected that it will remain or return to the county for:

  • any substantial period (6 months) or
  • for a committed use of an undetermined or unspecified period during the 12 months after the lien date

If the property does not meet the qualifications as discussed above, the location of the property is the location where it normally returns or is stored when not in use, such as a construction or rental yard, or the principal place of business of the owner if no such location exists.

What if I lease all my equipment? Do I still have to report it?

Yes. All True Leases, Capitalized Leased Equipment, and Lease to Purchase Option Equipment, where the final payment has not yet been made, are reported in Part III on the front of the property statement, or as an attached listing if more space is required.

Capitalized or Purchase Option Leased Equipment, where the final payment has been made, must be reported in Schedule A at the original cost and original year acquired, not the buyout cost or year the final payment was made.

I closed my business and the business assets are not being used. Why do I have to file a property statement or pay taxes?

Business property not in use but located within the county is still assessable. If you have received a Business Property Statement you should complete it for the remaining property and add a letter of explanation as to where and what the remaining assets are.

If you have not received a Business Property Statement, you should complete and return a Business Property Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor’s Office. There is a section regarding property remaining after a business closure. Based upon the information you provide, a review of your assessment will be completed.

What do I include in supplies?

Examples of reportable supplies are ordinary office, janitorial, manufacturing, fuel and chemical supplies; fuel, insecticides and fertilizer used by agricultural taxpayers; and medical supplies held by a doctor’s office to be given to patients, incidental to service, even if the samples were provided at no charge.

Put in the total amount of the retail value of supplies you had on hand on January 1. If you are not sure, make an estimate of the amount you normally keep on hand.

Can someone else file my Business Property Statement for me?

When signing, please remember that it is important to complete all the areas of the “Declaration by Assessee” in order to validate a signature.

The declaration must be signed by either the assessee/owner, a duly appointed fiduciary, or a person authorized to sign on behalf of the assessee such as: a member of the bar, a certified public accountant, a public accountant, an enrolled agent, a partner, corporate officer, LLC manager or managing member, or other person as defined by the State of California Board of Equalization.

In the case of a corporation: the declaration can be signed by an authorized employee or agent who has been designated to sign on behalf of the corporation, by the Board of Directors, by name or by title, only if a valid Agency Authorization has been filed with the Assessor.

In the case of a partnership, the declaration can be signed by an authorized employee or agent who has been designated to sign on behalf of the partnership, by name or by title, only if a valid Agency Authorization has been filed with the Assessor.

In the case of a Limited Liability Company (LLC), the declaration can be signed by an authorized employee or agent who has been designated to sign on behalf of the LLC manager or by the members, by name or by title, only if a valid Agency Authorization has been filed with the Assessor.

When a declaration is signed by an employee or agent, other than a member of the bar, a certified public accountant, a public accountant, an enrolled agent or a duly appointed fiduciary, the assessee’s written Agency Authorization form to authorize the employee or agent to sign the declaration on behalf of the Assessee must be filed with the Assessor. The Assessor may at any time require a person who signs a property statement and who is required to have written authorization to provide proof of authorization.

A Business Property Statement that is not signed and executed in accordance with the foregoing instructions is not considered a valid filing. The penalty imposed by section 463 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code for failure to file is applicable to non-valid or unsigned Business Property Statements.

How is the assessed value determined?

Depreciation tables are set for different types of equipment and are based on the annual Equipment and Fixtures Index, Percent Good and Valuation Factors approved by the California State Board of Equalization, Assessor’s Handbook 581. Equipment is depreciated based on the equipment’s original cost and type and year of acquisition to arrive at the fair market value.

Equipment Factors and Classifications

What if I do not agree with the values? Can my value be reviewed?

You may call, email, or write the Assessor’s Office to discuss the value and make a written request for an informal review. Please note that if the value was the result of an estimated assessment made by the Assessor for failure to file a property statement by May 7, of each year, you will need to complete and return a Business Property Statement with your request for an informal review.

What if I do not agree with the Assessor’s value after an Informal Review?

You can file an Application for Changed Assessment online or by calling (530) 889-4020. In order to appeal an assessment, you must file an Application for Changed Assessment with the Clerk of the Board between July 2 and September 15 (or the next business day if the September 15 falls on a weekend or holiday).

Should your value notice be the result of an Escape Assessment, you have 60 days from the date of the Notice of Enrollment of Escape Assessment to file an Application for Changed Assessment.

What should I do if I've closed, sold, or disposed of my business assets after January 1?

Please complete, sign, date, and return a Business Property Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor’s Office. Under California Law, the owner of assessable business property at 12:01 a.m., January 1 (lien date) is responsible for taxes and must be assessed at full value. Sale, closure, or disposal of property after the lien date does not relieve the Assessee of the obligation to report and pay taxes.

What should I do if I've closed, sold, or disposed of my business assets before January 1?

Please complete, sign, date, and return a Business Property Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor’s Office. Based upon that affidavit, a review of your assessment will be completed. If business property is still located within the county, it may still be assessable. Non-use or storage of a business asset is not the determining factor for its assessability.

Can my unsecured business property taxes be prorated?

No. Unsecured bills are never prorated regardless of the disposal date. Proration of taxes should be done between the buyer and seller at the time of sale.

I filed bankruptcy, why do I have to pay the tax?

Bankruptcy does not relieve the Assessor of determining a fair market value. Assessed value and payment of taxes are separate issues. Please contact the Placer County Tax Collector at (530) 889-4120 for issues regarding whether payment is required after bankruptcy.

Why do I have a 10% penalty note on my tax bill for my business?

Either the Assessor’s request to file a valid property statement was not received by May 7th, or no statement was received. California Revenue and Taxation Code section 463 mandates that a late filing penalty of 10% of the assessed value be added for statements not timely filed by May 7th. The Assessment Appeals Board is the only authority with the ability to abate a penalty for late filing.

I don't own the building, I just rent the space. Why do I have a tax bill?

The bill is not for real property such as the land or building. It is for the business personal property and fixtures used in the operation of a business such as desks, computers, counters, tables, stoves, and racking.

Where can I find additional information on Business Personal Property?

For additional information on Business Property, please visit the California State Board of Equalization at: http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/faqs/personal.htm.

Data Requests

Can I get Placer County Assessor data at no cost?

The Placer County Community Development Resource Agency has a website with Placer County Assessor Parcel Data that is updated twice a year and can be downloaded at no cost.

The fields available are:

  • Assessor’s Parcel Number
  • Tax Rate Area
  • Parcel Type
  • Taxability Code (including descriptions)
  • Taxable
  • Use Code (including descriptions)
  • Acres (if 1 acre or larger)
  • Effective Year
  • Structure Square Ft
  • Owner Address
  • Site Address (includes community but no zip codes)
  • Last Certified Land Value
  • Last Certified Structure Value
  • Neighborhood Code
  • Appraiser
  • SitusID
  • Assessment

How can I get a mailing list of property owners in Placer County?

All data requests are processed on an individual request basis. You may order by completing a Request For Data Form. Please see our Fee Schedule for pricing information.

Data is available in the following electronic formats only: Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, or CSV (comma separate values). The data can be provided via e-mail attachment, FTP transfer, or CD depending on payment method.

The fields available are:

  • Assessor’s Parcel Number
  • Tax Rate Area
  • Taxability Code (including descriptions)
  • Use Code (including descriptions)
  • Acres (if 1 acre or larger)
  • Owner Name
  • Owner Address
  • Site Address (includes community but no zip codes)
  • Last Certified Land Value
  • Last Certified Structure Value
  • Last Transfer Date
  • Deed Number

Can I attach a spreadsheet with a list of parcels to get all the available information?

Yes, please provide full parcel numbers in an Excel spreadsheet. The parcel number(s) must be 12 digits with no dashes.

I own/operate a business. Is it possible get the addresses of homes with pools in my local area (e.g.: Rocklin, Roseville, and Lincoln)?

Yes, a selection can be done based on Assessor’s map book pages (first three digits of parcel number), Assessment District (tax code), or Group Code (sometimes helpful in identifying an area).

Is a list available of all business owners that own and operate in Placer County?

Yes, a list is available for purchase.

You may order by completing a Request For Data Form. Please see our Fee Schedule for pricing information.

I would like a mailing address list of all subdivisions in Tahoe City including: Sky Land, Pine Land, Tahoe Woods, and Tahoe Pines.

We can do a selection based on Assessor’s map book pages (first three digits of APN), Assessment District (tax code), or Group Code (sometimes helpful in identifying an area).

Can data be supplied in label form?

We do not supply labels; however, we can provide electronic data in the following formats: Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, or CSV (comma separate values) that you can use to generate labels.

How can I purchase the Secured Tax Data Roll?

You can purchase the Placer County Assessment Master by completing the Request for Data Form. There are instructions on the back of this form as well as an informational sheet that will provide information regarding: cost, media type, format, ordering, payment, files available, and file layouts.

Is there a way to receive monthly data for people who have moved to the county?

We can provide you with data regarding people who have moved to Placer County; however we do not offer monthly subscriptions. All data requests are processed on an individual request basis.

Where can I find the Annual Assessed Valuation Reports?

Annual Assessed Valuation Reports are located on our website.

How can I obtain the Assessed Valuation for the City of Roseville for the past 5 years?

Annual Assessed Valuation Reports are located on our website.

Is there any other way to get Placer County Assessor data?

You can purchase Assessor Data for any of the 58 California Counties from Parcel Quest.

Homeowners' Exemption

Is there a fee to apply for the Homeowners' Exemption?

There is no charge to apply for the Homeowners’ Exemption.

I received a notice indicating there was a fee to apply for the Homeowners' Exemption. What should I do?

Disregard the notice. This is not an official mailing from the Assessor’s Office. There is never a charge to file a Homeowners’ Exemption form. If you are not receiving a Homeowners’ Exemption, contact the Assessor or access the application form on this website to apply for the exemption.

What is a Homeowners' Exemption?

California property tax law provides for an exemption of up to $7,000 of the assessed value of a dwelling that is used as a principal place of residence on January 1 of each year. This is a property tax savings of approximately $70.00 per year. In order to qualify for the exemption you must either:

1. Own and occupy the dwelling as your principal residence as of January 1, each year, or

2. Intend to occupy, as your principle residence, a recently purchased or constructed dwelling within ninety (90) days after the purchase or completion of construction.

If you qualify for this exemption under option number 2, the first year of the exemption will only apply to a Supplemental Assessment (if any).

How do I get a Homeowners' Exemption?

New property owners will usually receive an exemption application within 90 days of recording a deed. If you acquired the property more than 90 days ago and have not received an application, please contact the Assessor’ Office at assessor@placer.ca.gov, call (530) 889-4300, or download the Homeowners' Exemption form from our website.

What is the filing period for the Homeowners' Exemption?

The deadline to file for the full exemption is February 15 of each year. A partial exemption (80%) is available if filed between February 16 and December 10. The full exemption is also available on a supplemental assessment (up to the amount of the supplemental assessment), providing the full exemption has not already been applied to the property on the regular tax roll or on a prior supplemental assessment for the same year. The deadline to file for the full exemption on a supplemental assessment is within 30 days of the Notice of Supplemental Assessment. A partial exemption (80%) is available if filed after the 30th day of the Notice of Supplemental Assessment, but on or before the date on which the first installment of taxes on the supplemental tax bill becomes delinquent.

Do I need to reapply for this exemption every year?

No, once you have filed for a Homeowners’ Exemption and you continue to own and occupy the residence, you will automatically receive the exemption.

How can I verify that I am receiving a Homeowners' Exemption?

A Homeowners’ Exemption will appear as a $7,000 reduction in assessed value on your property tax bill.

If I move out and rent my house to someone else, am I eligible for the exemption?

No. If you do not own and occupy your home as your principal place of residence, you must cancel your Homeowners’ Exemption by writing our office. Please include the date you moved and your new mailing address.

May I claim the exemption on two properties, as live I in both?

No. The exemption is available for only one principal place of residence. If the dwelling is used as, or intended for use as, a vacation or secondary home, a rental property, or is vacant and unoccupied, it will not qualify for the Homeowners’ Exemption.

My wife & I live in separate residences. May we claim the exemption on both residences?

Yes, by using one person as claimant on each residence. Separate claims must be filed and the reason for having separate residences needs to be stated on the form. The attributes of residence may be determined by: the intention to remain there is not temporary; where you are registered to vote; where vehicles are registered; where you return after work and between trips; and where personal belongings are kept.

I have two residences on my property. May I claim the exemption on both residences?

Yes, if each person living in each residence is on title. Separate claims must be filed.

I am living in a motor home on the property. May I claim the exemption?

Yes, the owner may be living on the property in other ways than a conventional house.

I have the Disabled Veterans' Exemption. May I claim the Homeowners' Exemption also?

No, only one exemption can be claimed.

My title is in the name of my trust. May I claim the exemption?

Yes, if the trust is for the benefit of the person living on the property, while they are alive.

I did not know about the exemption. May I file for back years?

No, the exemption is processed as of our “received” date.

I don't want to disclose my Social Security Number. May I claim the exemption without it?

No, your social security number is necessary for tracking purposes to ensure that only one Homeowners’ Exemption is being claimed per person.

I don't have a Social Security Number. May I claim the exemption without it?

Yes, you may claim the exemption without it until you obtain a social security number. Please write “none” where the form asks for your social security number. You will need to verify this fact by supplying a copy of one or more of the following: Federal and/or State income tax returns; bank related documents such as account applications or statements; employment related documents such as hiring documents, health enrollment forms or dental plan enrollment forms. Also needed, will be a copy of a Medicare or Medi-Cal card or a California Drivers’ License or California Identification card to provide to the State Board of Equalization in lieu of a social security number.

Is the Homeowners' Exemption form considered public information?

No, the Homeowners' Exemption form is not public information; only the amount of the exemption that shows up on the tax roll is public information.

Is my Social Security Number used to track anything other than the Homeowners' Exemption?

Yes, it can be used to track child support information.

Does the exemption apply to servicemen who are not legal residents of California?

Yes, as long as the house is not rented.

For additional information on the Homeowners’ Exemption, please visit the California State Board of Equalization at: http://www.boe.ca.gov/proptaxes/exempt.htm#8.

Click on this link to directly access the Placer County Homeowners' Property Tax Exemption Form.

Mapping

Why do parcel numbers change?

There may be several reasons:

  • A map book page was reconfigured and the parcel was moved to another map book or page.
  • The parcel/property’s configuration changed causing the old parcel number(s) to be voided, and new parcel(s) to be created.
  • The maximum number of parcels numbers that could be assigned to a map page or block was reached. This requires all parcels on the page to be changed.

How long does it take for new parcel numbers to be created when a deed, Parcel Map or Subdivision records?

The Mapping Division processes all deeds/Maps in the date order they are recorded. You may contact our office and a member of our staff will provide an estimate of when the new number(s) will be available.

My parcel is ‘X’ acres and your office records show my parcel having only ‘Y’ acres (an amount that is less). Why does the size of my parcel show less than what I really have?

In most cases, the reason is due to a public road/access. If the parcel includes a portion of a public road, this area is subtracted from the gross acreage of the parcel.

Can I split or combine my parcels? What are the requirements?

A split is a separation of one Assessor’s parcel into two or more Assessor’s parcels, resulting in separate tax bills for each. A combination merges two or more current assessor parcels into one tax bill. This action is for property assessment purposes only. It does not imply legal lot status nor does it constitute legal lot approval by any Planning/Building authority. If you have questions regarding legal lots, you should contact the Planning Division of the Placer County Community Development Resource Agency (CDRA) at 530-745-3000.

Only the property owner or legally authorized agent can request to have a parcel split or combined for property tax purposes.

Below is a summary of the requirements. All new parcels will be created for the future roll.

  • Complete an Assessor’s Parcel Boundary Change Request (PCA627). A NON-REFUNDABLE fee of $73.00 for the first 2 new created or 2 parcels combined into 1 new parcel, as well as an additional $36.50 for each new or combined parcels must be included with this application.
  • A split must be along established lot lines from a recorded Subdivision or Parcel Map (unless splitting undivided interests in one parcel).
  • First and second installments for current and previous tax years due (or not yet due and payable) on the parcels being combined or split must be paid in full prior to request being processed.
  • The recorded ownership of all parcels must be exactly the same.
  • All parcels must be contiguous (directly adjoining each other and not separated by a roadway).
  • All parcels must be in the same Tax Rate Area (TRA); unless the size of the parcel to be combined or moved across existing TRA boundaries is less than 45,000 square feet or less than $50,000 in value.
    (R & T Code 606 (b) (c)).
  • The request must physically fit on the map page.

Why do I have two parcel numbers when I purchased one property?

There may be several reasons:

  • The property was split by a tax rate line. Tax rate lines are established by the State Board of Equalization. If the property in question is less than 45,000 square feet, or less than $50,000 in value, we can combine the parcels.
  • A road or water feature may divide the parcels or the parcels are on two different map pages and we cannot combine them.

Why can’t my two parcels be combined?

The most common reasons are:

  • There is not enough room on the map page.
  • The parcels are more than 45,000 square feet and are in different tax rate areas.
  • The parcels are assessed at more than $50,000 and are in different tax rate areas.
  • The ownership is not identical for all of the parcels.

What can I do about being charged double for the direct charges and/or special assessments?

The Assessor's Office is not involved with special assessments (direct charges). We suggest you contact the Placer County Auditor-Controller at 530-889-4160 or call the phone number associated with the direct charge(s) on your tax bill.

How can I get an Assessor Map from your website?

You may obtain maps from our website by following the following steps:

  1. Start at the Assessment Inquiry page
  2. Enter the Assessor Parcel Number using all 12 numbers in the green “Assessor Inquiry” area in the Fee Parcel field
    Image of Assessor Inquiry Screen
  3. Click Submit
  4. Click the desired underlined assessment number
    Image of Assessor Inquiry Screen
  5. Click on “View Maps”
    Image of Assessor Inquiry Screen
  6. The map will open in PDF format

Can I get a copy of the Survey/Parcel or Subdivision maps?

The Assessor’s Office does not provide copies of these maps to the public. We suggest you contact the Placer County Clerk-Recorder’s Office at 530-886-5600.

Where would I get a site/plot plan of my property?

You will need to contact the city building department where your property is located. If your property is located in an unincorporated area of Placer County, you may contact the Community Development Resource Agency (CDRA) Building Services at 530-745-3010.

Where would I get my existing building plans?

You will need to contact the city building department where your property is located. . If your property is located in an unincorporated area of Placer County, you may contact the Community Development Resource Agency (CDRA) Building Services at 530-745-3010. Our office can provide building record information from our property files. You will need to provide identification (driver’s license, ID card) to verify you are the owner of the property.

Ownership

What is a change in ownership?

For property tax purposes, a change in ownership in real property is the transfer of a present interest in real property, including the transfer of the rights to the beneficial use thereof (Revenue and Taxation Code 60). Often a change in ownership occurs upon the purchase, sale, gift, or inheritance of real property. Generally, a change in ownership will initiate a reassessment of any property; however, certain exclusions may apply as outlined below:

  • The transfer of property between husband and wife.
  • The transfer of property between registered domestic partners.
  • The transfer of property to a co-tenant as the result of the death of the other co-tenant.
  • The transfer of property between parents and children.
  • The transfer of property between grandparents and grandchildren.
  • The transfer of property between individuals and a legal entity (or between legal entities) where the proportional ownership interest remains exactly the same before and after the transfer.

Will adding a spouse on title to my property result in a reassessment?

No. An interspousal transfer will not result in a reassessment.

Will refinancing my property result in a reassessment?

Generally, refinancing will not cause a reassessment of the property as long as you do not add or delete someone from the title. If you add or delete someone from title, the person contending that the change in ownership is only for refinancing purposes has the burden of proving that assertion.

Will transferring title to a legal entity result in a reassessment?

In general, the transfer of any interest in real property to a corporation, partnership, limited liability company, or other legal entity is a change in ownership of the interest transferred and will be reassessed. Exceptions: Transfers between individuals and legal entities or between legal entities which result solely in the method of holding title and in which the proportional ownership interest remained the same before and after the transfer are not subject to reassessment. If this applies, the property owner will be required to provide documentation to the Assessor’s Office such as but not limited to, corporation papers listing all stockholders and/or all stock certificates issued with voting rights, articles of organization; or partnership agreements listing all members and their percentages of interest; or the operating agreement listing all members and their percentages of interest in the limited liability company.

Does the death of a property owner result in a reassessment of the property they own?

Generally, yes. However, the property may qualify for a reassessment exclusion, if one of the following conditions applies:

  • The transfer of property between husband and wife.
  • The transfer of property between registered domestic partners.
  • The transfer of property between co-tenants.
  • The transfer of property between parent and child.
  • The transfer of property between grandparent and grandchildren.

What documents need to be submitted to the Assessor’s Office upon the death of a property owner?

A Change in Ownership Statement Death of Real Property Owner (BOE-502-D) form must be filed with the Assessor’s Office within 150 days after the property owner’s death. Additional documents may be needed:

Will the property be reassessed if the decedent’s property passes to the spouse or registered domestic partner?

No. State law excludes from reassessment property transferred between husband and wife, and registered domestic partners*.

*Registered Domestic Partners are two people who have filed a Declaration of Domestic Partnership with the California Secretary of the State.

Can property be reassessed if the decedent’s property passes to a co-tenant?

Yes. However, the co-tenant may qualify for reassessment exclusion. In order to qualify a claim for an Affidavit of Cotenant Residency (BOE-58-H) must be filed with our office.

Can property be reassessed if the decedent held the property in a trust?

Yes. A change in ownership occurs upon the date of death of the owner of the property, also referred to as the trustor, or present beneficiary of the trust. Generally, the change in ownership and, if applicable, the date of reassessment, is the date of the death of the property owner, not the date of distribution to the heirs, or successor beneficiaries.

Will property be reassessed if it passes to the decedent’s children?

Yes. However, if all or some of the property is passing to the decedent’s children, the decedent’s children may qualify for reassessment exclusion. In order to qualify, a Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer between Parent and Child (BOE-58-AH) must be filed with our office within a specified time frame. A claim must be filed within three years after the date of transfer (event), or prior to transfer to a third party, whichever is earlier, or within 6 months after the mailing of the notice of supplemental or escape assessment.

If the above time requirements have expired, and the property has not been transferred to a third party, a claim can still be filed, however, the exclusion will only apply to future tax years.

Are parent/child transfers automatically excluded from reassessment?

No. In order to receive reassessment exclusion, a Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer between Parent and Child (BOE-58-AH) must be filed with our office within a specified time frame. A claim must be filed within three years after the date of transfer (event), or prior to transfer to a third party, whichever is earlier, or within 6 months after the mailing of the notice of supplemental or escape assessment.

If the above time requirements have expired, and the property has not been transferred to a third party, a claim can still be filed, however, the exclusion will only apply to future tax years.

Is there a deadline for filing a Claim for Reassessment Exclusion for Transfer between Parent and Child?

Yes, A claim must be filed within three years after the date of transfer (event), or prior to transfer to a third party, whichever is earlier, or within 6 months after the mailing of the notice of supplemental or escape assessment.

If the above time requirements have expired, and the property has not been transferred to a third party, a claim can still be filed, however, the exclusion will only apply to future tax years.

Is property eligible for exclusion if it is received or inherited from a grandparent?

In some cases, yes. Transfers from grandparent to grandchild are eligible for reassessment exclusion only if all the parents of the grandchild, that qualify as children of the grandparent, are deceased. In order to receive an exclusion, a Claim for Reassessment Exclusion Transfer from Grandparent to Grandchild (BOE-58-G) must be filed with our office within a specific time frame. A claim must be filed within three years after the date of transfer (event), or prior to transfer to a third party, whichever is earlier, or within 6 months after the mailing of the notice of supplemental or escape assessment.

If the above time requirements have expired, and the property has not been transferred to a third party, a claim can still be filed, however, the exclusion will only apply to future tax years.

Possessory Interests

What is a Possessory Interest?

A Possessory Interest (PI) is created when a private party has the beneficial use of tax-exempt (government owned) property.

Why do I have to pay property taxes if the property is tax-exempt?

The California property tax laws allow for the users of the property to be assessed when the owner is tax-exempt because it is government owned.

How do Possessory Interests differ from other assessments?

Possessory Interests are only those rights held by the private possessor. PI’s do not include the value of any rights retained by the public owner or any right that will revert back to the public owner at the end of the term of possession. PI assessments are normally less and often significantly less than fee simple assessments of similar, privately owned property.

How does the Assessor distinguish which Possessory Interests are assessable and those which are not?

For a Possessory Interest to be taxable it must be:

  1. Exclusive: Its holder must be able to exclude others from interfering with the use of the property, (or, where there is concurrent use, the concurrent use does not significantly interfere with the holder’s use).
  2. Independent: The use must be independent of the public owner. That is, its holder may exercise authority and control of the property apart from the rules and regulations of the public owner.
  3. Durable: There must be reasonably certain evidence to show that the possession will continue for a determinable period of time.

Why are Possessory Interest holders being charged property tax in addition to the rent they pay to a government entity? Isn’t that a form of double taxation?

Government entities do not pay property tax and thus their rent charges do not include an increment to recover such taxes. At the same time, the private possessor still receives the services and benefits (fire and police protection, schools and local government) that other similar taxable properties enjoy and the Possessory Interest property tax helps to pay the holder’s fair share of those costs.

How are Possessory Interests valued?

The income approach is the most commonly relied upon method. The value is typically based on the lease payments made to the landlord of the term of possession by the occupant.

Why are Possessory Interests assessed on the Unsecured Tax Roll?

Possessory Interests are normally assessed on the Unsecured Tax Roll because the property is not owned by the assessee and cannot provide security for the taxes owed. The county cannot lien the property in order to satisfy a delinquent property tax. PI’s are assessed as real property on the Unsecured Roll but still fall under the umbrella of Proposition 13. Although PI’s appear on the Unsecured Roll, they are still assessed according to the laws pertaining to secured real property.

How do Possessory Interest Unsecured tax bills differ from Secured Roll tax bills?

  • Unsecured tax bills are due and payable in full no later August 31st each year. If paid after August 31st, a penalty of 10% plus costs will be added to the amount due.
  • Unsecured tax bills are not split into two installments with two different delinquency dates, as is true of Secured Roll tax bills.

I received a tax bill for the year July 1st through June 30th, but I vacated the property in March. Why do I have to pay for the year after I vacated?

The assessee is determined on January 1st each year for the upcoming fiscal year, July 1st through June 30th. Tax bills for unsecured property become delinquent if not paid by August 31st each year. Contact the Assessor if you vacate the property between January 1st and June 30th.

Where can additional information about Possessory Interest Assessments be obtained?

Assessor’s Hand Book AH-517, The Appraisal of Possessory Interests

State Responsibility Area (SRA) Fire Prevention Fee

What is the Fire Prevention Fee?

It is an annual fee assessed to owners of habitable structures on property located within the State Responsibility Area (SRA). The SRA is an area where the State of California is financially responsible for the prevention and suppression of wildfires. The SRA does not include lands within incorporated city boundaries or federally owned lands.

The fee is applied to each habitable structure within the SRA. A “habitable structure” is a building that can be occupied for residential use. Habitable structures do not include detached garages, barns, or sheds. Owners of habitable structures who are also within the boundaries of a local fire protection agency will receive a reduction of $35 per habitable structure.

This fee will fund a variety of important fire prevention services within the SRA including brush clearance and activities to improve forest health so the forest can better withstand wildfire.

What type of structures will have the fee applied?

This fee is assessed annually to the owners of habitable structures located within the State Responsibility Area (SRA). The SRA is an area where the State of California is financially responsible for the prevention and suppression of wildfires.

A "habitable structure" is a building that can be occupied for residential use. These include single family homes, multi-dwelling structures, mobile and manufactured homes, condominiums and apartment buildings. Habitable structures do not include incidental buildings such as detached garages, barns, outdoor sanitation facilities and sheds.

What is the Assessor's involvement?

The Assessor has no association with the State Fire Prevention Fee that property owners are billed. While the State may utilize information obtained from the local assessment roll, the Assessor did not provide information that identifies which structures are habitable or uninhabitable.

Who determines who pays the fee?

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) is responsible for identifying owners subject to the fee and determining the fee amount. The Board of Equalization (BOE) is responsible for issuing bills on behalf of CAL FIRE.

How do I pay my bill?

Questions regarding the collection process, or payment of your bill, should be directed to BOE's Special Taxes and Fees staff at 1-800-400-7115. You may also go to the BOE website at http://www.boe.ca.gov/sptaxprog/fire_prev_fee.htm for additional information.

Where can I find additional information?

The following resources are available:

Taxpayers' Bill Of Rights

State Board of Equalization's Responsibility

The State Board of Equalization Property Taxpayers’ Advocate is responsible for reviewing and distributing property tax information and for the prompt resolution of taxpayer inquiries, complaints, and problems. The Taxpayers’ Rights Advocate Office may be reached by phoning (888) 324-2798 or at http://www.boe.ca.gov.

Assessor's Responsibility

The Assessor is elected to a 4-year term. As an elected department head, the Assessor is required by the State Constitution to locate and assess all taxable property in the County.

Taxpayer's Responsibility

Since any increase in assessed value will increase the amount of taxes you pay, it is very important to contact the Assessor’s Office if you feel that the new assessment value differs from the market value of your property. We welcome the opportunity to review any information you may have relating to the value of your property. If you have any questions concerning the valuation, please call the Assessor’s Office.

Taxable property includes both real and personal property.

Real Property consists of land and improvements permanently affixed to land. For example, homes, buildings, other structures, pools, fences, orchards, vineyards, and certain machinery or equipment affixed to land, including taxable mobile homes, (those on a permanent foundation) are all classified as improvements.

Personal Property consists of tangible property not classified as land or improvements. For example, office equipment and furnishings; commercial, industrial and agricultural machinery and equipment not affixed to land; business supplies; boats, aircraft and manufactured homes not attached to a permanent foundation are all classified as personal property.

Real Property Appraisal

Article XIII-A of the California Constitution (Proposition 13) requires the Assessor to reappraise real property at its full market value when either of the following occurs:

  1. A change in ownership.
  2. New construction is completed (or partially completed on the lien date).

When real property is reappraised due to the above, a new “base year” is established. This base year value must be adjusted annually by an inflationary factor, not to exceed 2% per year. In any year, your assessment, adjusted for inflation, is referred to as the “factored base year value.”

Business Personal Property Appraisal

Unlike most real property, business personal property is reappraised annually. Assessments are based on reported acquisition years and costs, which are adjusted annually to reflect market value. When statutorily required or otherwise requested, business owners must annually file a Business Property Statement with the Assessor, detailing acquisitions and disposals of equipment in order for the Business Property Division to derive appropriate values. Manufactured Homes, although classified as personal property, are treated, for valuation purposes, in the same manner as real property, and therefore, are not reappraised annually.

Value Review Program

What is a Temporary Decline in Value?

Revenue and Taxation Code Section 51 requires the assessor to enroll either a property’s Factored-Base-Year Value (established under Proposition 13) or its market value as of the lien date.

This reduction is temporary and the assessor is required to review the market value of the property each lien date after the reduction until such time as the Factored-Base-Year Value is less than or equal to the market value.

When the Factored-Base-Year Value is again enrolled, the property is no longer subject to the annual review, and will receive indexing not to exceed 2% per year.

Do properties other than single-family residences qualify?

Yes, all real property qualifies.

How can the assessed value of my property be increased after you reduced it?

The assessor is required to review and increase the value to market or the Factored-Base-Year Value as of each lien date following the initial reduction.

Just as there is no limit on the amount of reduction, there is no limit to the amount being restored to the Factored-Base-Year Value.

Is the Assessor required to restore my protected Proposition 13 value even if it’s more than a 2% increase?

Yes, just as there is no limit to the amount of reduction when arriving at market value, there is no limit to the amount being restored when market value increases, up to the factored Proposition 13 base year amount.

If I have been granted a reduction for the current year will I have to request another review next year?

No, once you have been granted a reduction pursuant to Proposition 8 your next year's value will automatically be reviewed. A Notification of Assessed Value will be sent to you in July, which will indicate our findings.

What should I do if I disagree with the value placed on my property?

If after review of the Notification of Assessed Value you disagree with the value, you have until September 15 (or the next business day if the 15th falls on a weekend or holiday) of that year in which to file an Application for Changed Assessment with the Assessment Appeals Board.

Why isn't my value reduction permanent?

Proposition 8 (now California State Revenue and Taxation Code Section 51) requires the Assessor to compare each property's Factored-Base-Year value with the current market value, and enroll the lesser of the two each year.

What if after having been given a reduction, my value continues to decline?

Once a property value has been lowered for Proposition 8, your next year’s assessed value will be automatically reviewed. The lower of current market value and Factored-Base-Year Value will be enrolled.

What will happen to my assessment if values start to rise?

Your taxable value reduction to market value is temporary and the assessor is required to review the market value of the property each lien date after the reduction, until such time as the Factored-Base-Year Value is less than or equal to the market value.

Unless there is a change in ownership or new construction, this increase in value cannot exceed the original assessed value plus the annual inflationary factor not to exceed 2 Percent per year.

My land value looks alright, but my structure value looks high. Can I just have my structure value lowered?

No, the total property value must be considered. Only total assessed value can be compared.

The lower of total property current market value and total property assessed value is enrolled.

Vessels / Boats

Why do I have to pay taxes on my vessel?

California Constitution Article XIII and Revenue and Taxation Code Section 201 state that all property is taxable unless it is stated that it is exempt. Personal property is not exempt.

I paid the sales tax when I purchased the vessel and paid registration fees to the Department of Motor Vehicles. Why am I paying taxes again?

Sales and/or use tax and property tax are two different types of taxes.

  • Sales tax is paid at the time of purchase.
  • Personal property taxes are paid annually. Payments made to the Department of Motor Vehicles do not include property tax.

Why do I have a Vessel Property Statement?

This is a requirement of section 441(d) of the California Revenue and Taxation Code. Statements are sent in order to gather the most up to date information on the property so that an accurate value can be determined.

What will happen if I do not return the Vessel Property Statement?

It is important that the Vessel Property Statement be returned even if you no longer own the vessel. If a statement is not returned, an estimated assessment will be made using the best information available, and a 10% penalty on the assessed value will be added for failure to file as mandated by the California Revenue & Taxation Code section 463.

Where will my vessel be assessed since I take it to many locations?

The vessel must be assessed where habitually moored or situated. The location where a vessel is habitually moored or situated is the location where the vessel is usually present when not in use. Department of Motor Vehicles information will indicate that principal location. Vessels registered in the State of California (bow numbers beginning with CF) must be principally located within the state to maintain such registration. The jurisdiction for property tax assessment resides with the state in which the vessel is registered.

My vessel was stored or located in the State of Nevada on the lien date of January 1. Why do I have to pay California taxes?

The jurisdiction for property tax assessment resides with the state in which the vessel is registered. Vessels registered in the State of California (bow numbers beginning with CF) must be principally located within the state to maintain such registration. If the principal location for your vessel is in the State of Nevada, you must register it with Nevada to be subject to Nevada taxation. To relieve you of your property tax assessment in California, you must provide us with proof of Nevada State registration, effective before the January 1 lien date.

How is the value determined?

Value is determined by reviewing the Vessel Property Statement, current market data, confirmed sales of similar vessels, and value guides such as NADA.

Why is the average retail value, as listed in the price guides for January 1, different from the assessed value?

California Revenue and Taxation Property Tax Rule 10 mandate that the Assessor include within the value all components of the full economic cost of placing property in service. A vessel value will typically include an adjustment to add sales or use tax.

Why did my vessel value go up/down from last year?

For the purpose of California property taxation, vessels are valued at their fair market value each and every year as of the January 1 lien date. Values determined for previous years cannot be used as a factor in determining the current year’s value. Values can increase as well as decrease from year to year because of fluctuations in the market. Vessels, unlike real property, are not subject to a base year value or a minimum inflationary factor. The fair market value of a vessel on lien date is unrelated to its net book value (purchase price less depreciation).

What if I do not agree with the vessel value?

You may call, email, or write to the Assessor’s Office to discuss the value. When making a written request for an informal review, please note that if the value was the result of an estimated assessment made by the Assessor for failure to file a property statement by May 7, you will need to complete and return a Vessel Property Statement with your request for an informal review.

When writing to request an informal review, please provide the following in support of your opinion of value:

  • Comparable sales of aircraft that have sold close to January 1st. Sales occurring after March 31st may not be considered.
  • Photos and estimates to repair (if condition considerably affects the value).
  • The exact year, make, and model (if not previously provided).
  • Documentation showing the insured value as of January 1st.
  • An appraisal for the vessel.
  • Any additional documentation that would support your opinion of value.

What if I still do not agree with the vessel value after an Assessor’s Informal Review?

You can file an Application for Changed Assessment online or by calling (530) 889-4020. In order to appeal an assessment, you must file an Application for Changed Assessment with the Clerk of the Board, between July 2 and September 15 (or the next business day if the September 15 falls on a weekend or holiday).

Should your value notice be the result of an Escape Assessment, you have 60 days from the date of the Notice of Enrollment of Escape Assessment to file an Application for Changed Assessment.

Why do I have a 10% penalty note on my tax bill for my vessel?

Either the Assessor’s request to file a valid statement was not received by May 7th, or no statement was received. California Revenue & Taxation Code section 463 mandates that a late filing penalty of 10% of the assessed value be added for valid statements not timely filed by May 7th. The Assessment Appeals Board is the only authority with the ability to abate a penalty for late filing.

What should I do when I sell my vessel?

File a release of liability with the California Department of Motor Vehicles, and notify the Assessor’s Office in writing with information regarding the sale. Please complete and return a Vessel Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor's Office.

I sold or disposed of my vessel after January 1st. Why do I have a tax bill?

Please complete and return a Vessel Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor’s Office. Under California Law, the owner of a vessel at 12:01 a.m., January 1 (lien date), is responsible for taxes and must be assessed at full value. Sale or disposal of property after the lien date does not relieve the Assessee of the obligation to pay taxes.

I sold or disposed of my vessel before January 1st. Why do I have a tax bill?

Please complete and return a Vessel Affidavit to the Placer County Assessor’s Office. Based upon that affidavit, an informal review of your assessment will be completed.

Can my taxes be prorated?

No. Unsecured bills are never prorated regardless of the disposal date. Any proration of taxes should be done between the buyer and seller at the time of sale.

I filed bankruptcy. Why do I have to pay the tax?

Bankruptcy does not relieve the Assessor of determining a fair market value. Assessed value and payment of taxes are separate issues. You should contact the Placer County Tax Collector at (530) 889-4120 for issues regarding whether payment is required after bankruptcy.



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