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Kings Beach Project Making Big Improvements to Area’s Commercial Core

October 24, 2014

After construction work during its first Tahoe Basin construction season, the Kings Beach Commercial Core Improvement project is ahead of schedule. While newly completed features are readily apparent along a 1.1-mile stretch of State Highway 28 through the center of Kings Beach, much of the work completed this season is actually below ground level.

The project is improving roadway, pedestrian and bicycle travel, in addition to building roadside drainage facilities and providing treatment for storm water runoff. Fine sediment in the runoff is a culprit in the reduction of clarity of Lake Tahoe’s famed waters.  

“It is truly impressive to see what’s been done so far in Kings Beach,” said Supervisor Jennifer Montgomery, whose 5th District includes Placer County’s portion of Lake Tahoe. “In addition to the environmental and aesthetic benefits this project will provide, it will make this jewel of the North Shore a much more walkable community.” 

The project is also making pedestrian safety improvements, including speed humps, in the Kings Beach grid, which include the residential roads to the north of the state highway. Sidewalks, curbs and gutters have been installed in the project area that will make Kings Beach a much more walkable community. The state highway, which was previously a four-lane thoroughfare, has been reduced to three lanes, and two roundabouts have been installed to slow traffic and provide pedestrians with islands of safety when crossing the highway.

“With the diligent work of county staff who are at the project site most of each working day, Q&D, the main contractor and CHM2Hill, the construction manager, we are well ahead of schedule,” said Peter Kraatz, Assistant Director of Placer County’s Department of Public Works, which is handling the project. “We appreciate the patience of the residents and visitor alike and are pleased with the work that was accomplished during the first construction season.”

Some of the work completed this season includes:

  • Nearly 8,000 feet of sidewalk;
  • Almost 10,000 feet of storm drain pipe;
  • 400 feet of granite stone seat wall;
  • Four, 10,000-gallon sediment vaults;
  • Seven, 5,000-gallon sediment vaults;
  • Public parking facilities; and
  • Two advanced stormwater treatment systems that will help prevent fine sediment from reaching the lake.

To accomplish the underground work needed for the stormwater treatment systems. Placer County worked with the North Tahoe Public Utility District, AT&T, Liberty Utilities, Charter Communications, and Southwest gas to move their existing utilities to accommodate the water treatment systems. Because nearly 95 percent of the underground work was completed this year, when the construction season begins next spring, the bulk of the construction will be surface improvements.

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