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Placer County no-camping ordinance takes effect Aug. 6

August 05, 2015

An ordinance banning unauthorized camping on Placer County land goes into effect Aug. 6. Placer County is planning a cleanup of the area most impacted by this new law, the Placer County Government Center in north Auburn, on Aug. 11.

Placer County Government CenterAs of Aug. 6, anyone camping, using a campfire or storing belongings on the lawn will be subject to citation or arrest. Fliers and signs have been posted encouraging people to immediately remove their belongings and notifying them of the planned cleanup day. County staff and advocates for the homeless have also been working for weeks to proactively inform homeless people in the area about this change that will require them to find somewhere else to stay and store their belongings. A dumpster has been provided to help them dispose of any unwanted belongings.

On Aug. 11, evidence technicians from the Placer County Sheriff’s Office will collect personal property left on the lawn; catalog it; and securely wrap, tag and store it for 90 days. Inmate crews will follow behind and clean up the lawn area. Notices will be left behind to alert people whose belongings were collected about how to retrieve their property, and crisis counselors with county Health and Human Services will be on hand to help anyone struggling to make the transition.

“We are using a reasoned, balanced approach that treats homeless campers with respect and preserves their belongings while ensuring that camping on the lawn area comes to an end,” said County Executive Officer David Boesch. “Homelessness is an issue we take very seriously, and we continue to seek a long-term solution to address homelessness throughout the county.”
The Placer County Board of Supervisors adopted the no-camping ordinance July 7 after community concern arose over the prevalence of homeless campers at the government center. The county worked with community groups to provide a temporary homeless shelter nearby, which opened in June, and continues to work with those groups to develop a better long-term solution as quickly as possible.

The county continues to pursue a regional, public-private partnership approach, based on the recommendations of our nationally renowned consultant, Dr. Robert Marbut. Additionally, at its meeting Aug. 4, the board of supervisors voted to renew grant agreements with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to receive funds for permanent supportive housing, shelter and health care services, totaling nearly $800,000.

 

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