Bear River Campground

A photograph of the Bear River and two people fishing


Welcome to Bear River Campground

Located in Colfax, the Bear River Campground offers a variety of recreational activities from camping, hiking, swimming, fishing, gold panning and much more! The campground is home to five miles of trails that run throughout the park’s 200 acre property where wildlife such as deer, porcupines and squirrels are often seen. Make your online camping reservation now.

Placer County is in partnership with the California Land Management (CLM) who maintain, operate and assist with the Bear River Campground site.


notice

Placercounty parks has enacted the following protocols to slow the SPREAD OF covid-19

Bear River Campground

To the extentwe safely can, we are pleased to keep this facility open as a place foressential outdoor exercise during these challenging times.

NOTICE: 

·       Opening day for camping ispostponed - from April 1 until at least May 1 for all family and groupcampsites.

·       No new campsite reservationsare being taken until further notice.

·        Check status before visit:  https://www.placer.ca.gov/5951/Bear-River-Campground

·       Day Use Area remains open,subject to guidelines below:

 

Day use area andtrail system remain open subject to orderly and safe use.  Visitors are expected to practice socialdistancing (stay at least 6 feet away from non-household members) and avoid useof high contact areas including bathrooms and picnic tables.

Please beconsiderate of people around you and neighbors in the rural surroundings.  Day Use and Trails can only remain open if visitors conduct themselves in anorderly and safe manner.

As conditionssurrounding the Covid-19 response change rapidly, please check status beforeyou begin your trip.  Reservations andopen status are subject to change with short notice.  Thank you for your patience as we all learnto cope with the threat of Covid-19 together.

 

 

Formore general inquiries around COVID-19 and Placer County’s directives, viewcurrent information at www.placer.ca.gov/coronavirus. Publichotline also available at 530-886-5310.


Location

2500 Campground Road
Colfax, CA 95713

Day-Use Hours of Operation

1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset

Camping Season

April 1st through October 31st

FAQs

Click here for frequently asked questions about this park

Contact

Parks Division
Phone: (530) 886-4901
Email: [email protected]
Emergency: 911 or Colfax Dispatch (530) 346-2256

No Open Flames: July 1st through October 31st

  • No campfires and no fireworks allowed at any time
  • No fireworks allowed at any time
  • For more detailed information, please click on the PDF below:
    FIRE RESTRICTIONS INFORMATION (PDF)

Trail Length & Use

5 miles of multiple-use trail for horses, bicycles and hikers.

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Amenities

  • Camping
  • Fishing
  • Gold Panning
  • Hiking


  • Photography
  • Rafting/Tubing
  • Swimming
  • Barbecuing (seasonal)

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Camping Reservations

Make your online camping reservations here!

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Map

Wireless service is limited, download a map to your mobile device prior to your visit.

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Documents

Access FIRE RESTRICTIONS, fee schedules, Placer County Codes, reservation policies as well as deposit and cancellation information and additional information about the Bear River Campground.

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Twitter

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Facebook

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Instagram

Make sure to check out Placer County's Instagram; #bearrivercampground #placerlife


Bear River Campground Multipurpose Trail


A photograph of the Bear River with mountains, trees and plants

Natural History

The Bear River is part of a large network of steams draining the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. It was to these streams and rivers that the pioneers of the 1800's came to seek their fortunes. Although the "Gold Rush" is over, the Bear River is still a valuable mining resource. However, today it is aggregate, not gold, which is taken from the river bed.

Camping

Bear River Campground Opens April 1st and Closes October 31st. There are 23 Family and 2 Group Camp sites available.

Fishing

Fishing is permitted on the Bear River pursuant to State Freshwater Fishing Regulations. Hunting is expressly prohibited. In addition to the rainbow trout, most frequently caught, german brown, smallmouth bass, and blue gill are also common. The fishing regulations of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife apply here in the campground.

Gold Panning

Gold panning is permitted, however, it is unlawful to operate motorized mining equipment pursuant to Placer County Code (12.24.020(G)). Excavating or removing soil from above the water line (high-banking) is prohibited.

Hiking Trails

Bear River offers a wonderful hike through nature with five miles of natural surface trails to help you explore the park and enjoy nature. Some trails are narrow and caution is advised.

Photography

The natural beauty of the canyon and river are ideal settings for nature photography.

Rafting/Tubing

Cruising along the riffles of the Bear River on a raft or inner tube can be a fun and relaxing way to spend an afternoon. Rafters can use the section of river from the upper to the lower portion of the campground, or shuttle to the Dog Bar Road Bridge about 2.5 miles downstream of the campground. Be aware of swift and cold water conditions that can change rapidly.

Swimming

Refreshing swimming holes can be found along the Bear River. Beware of swift and cold water conditions, particularly early in the season. There is no lifeguard on duty.

Wildlife

Wildlife is also abundant although most are wary of people and are not often seen. Always be careful of rattlesnakes which are native to this area. Among the many animals living in the park are: black-tailed deer, bobcats, foxes, porcupines, raccoons, skunks, and squirrels.

Plant Life

At the park’s average elevation of 1,800 feet, there exists a diversity of plant life, from willows and alders at the river’s edge, to towering ponderosa pines and douglas firs along the hiking trails. Beneath these largest members of the plant community can be found a variety of grasses, wildflowers and shrubs, such as: bleeding heart, California buckeye, ceanothus, elderberry, manzanita, mountain misery, poison oak, toyon, and trillium.