Placer County's Mobile Crisis Team expands services to 24/7 coverage 

Published Jan. 3, 2024

Starting January 1, 2024, Placer County’s Mobile Crisis Team transitioned to round-the-clock service, seven days a week, to meet people in crisis where they are – whether in a park, at a school, in a shelter, at home, in a parking lot, or beyond. The expansion is a step forward in providing immediate help for people experiencing mental health or substance use crises, including homeless individuals. 

The Mobile Crisis Team, operated by Health and Human Services, has been a vital resource for Placer County residents for nearly a decade, offering on-the-spot support. Once a service primarily for adults, in recent years Mobile Crisis has also begun serving youth and families, while doubling in size. In the last fiscal year, the team responded to nearly 500 calls across the county, from individuals in crises themselves or their loved ones, or as a referral from partners such as law enforcement or schools.

“Having this team available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, will ensure that people get timely help when they need it most and do not fall through the cracks,” said Adult System of Care director Amy Ellis. “If you or a loved one is in crisis, please call 1-888-886-5401.”

The mobile crisis team is comprised of a mental health clinician, a psychiatric nurse and/or a peer advocate, who is an individual with special training and lived experience. These teams help people develop safe and supportive plans to cope with mental health crises. Services are tailored to individual needs yet may include nursing triage, referrals for needed services and linkage to ongoing mental health treatment. Mobile crisis services are in the process of expanding statewide. 

Placer’s Mobile Crisis Team serves most of the county, from Roseville to the Alta area, with separate mobile teams for the Tahoe-Truckee area operated by a contractor through both Placer and Nevada counties. The team collaborates closely with local law enforcement agencies, educators, treatment providers and other community partners to receive referrals, but individuals in crisis or their loved ones can also call for help directly at 1-888-886-5401.

“Our goal is to use a ‘whatever it takes’ approach during a crisis in order to help people remain safely in the community, surrounded by their families and support network; hospitalization is only considered if absolutely necessary,” said Children’s System of Care director Twylla Abrahamson.